Archive for the 'Family' Category

LOVE IS A GAME… Part 2 (signalling)

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011 by Anh

Following my last post, I have been given a great article by Peter Sozou and Robert Seymour (titled “Costly but worthless gifts facilitate courtship“) about the application of game theory in relationship issues. This unconventional article on game theory shows the great power economists have to solve social problems. It is free and worth reading if you are keen on studying game theory.

And apparently, intrinsically worthless gifts (e.g. an engagement ring?) are great signals.

Are tax breaks for married couples a good idea?

Monday, January 18th, 2010 by econ-network

In many ways economics is the study of incentives. An incentive is any factor (financial or non-financial) that enables or motivates a particular course of action, or counts as a reason for preferring one choice to the alternatives.

In English, Incentives make you want to do something you otherwise wouldn’t want to do. Today let’s talk about an incentive which is in the media at the moment, the oft criticised, proposed marriage tax break. (more…)

Children of Socially Active Parents have Better Exam Results

Wednesday, March 19th, 2008 by Paul Ayres

RES logoIn the latest of out podcasts supporting the Royal Economic Society Conference 2008, Romesh Vaitilingam talks to Karl Taylor about how socially active parents choose to be and the effect that can have on their kids.

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Parents who are active in various kinds of clubs “from sports to charities, from political parties to religious groups“ may raise the test scores of their children. That is the central finding of new research by Professor Sarah Brown and Dr Karl Taylor presented at the Royal Economic Society’s 2008 annual conference.

The report uses data from the National Child Development Study, which has tracked the lives of a representative sample of the British public born in a single week in 1958. It finds that the test scores of children in reading, mathematics and vocabulary tests are positively related to their parents’ level of social participation.

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Smoking During Pregnancy: Giving Up By Month 5 Can Prevent Underweight Babies

Tuesday, May 15th, 2007 by Paul Ayres

Royal Economic Society logoIn the latest of a series of interviews from the Royal Economic Society Conference 2007, Romesh Vaitilingam talks to Emma Tominey about the effect of smoking during pregnancy.

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Mothers who smoke during pregnancy will have smaller babies. But much of the harm is due to unobservable traits of the mother. If mums stub it out by the time they are five months pregnant, the damage is as good as undone.

At the same time, the lasting harm to babies is greatest if the mothers have low education. So a much more holistic approach to improving child health in pregnancy is needed to help thousands of children break out of the poverty trap.

These are the conclusions of extensive new research by Emma Tominey, presented to the Royal Economic Society’s 2007 annual conference at the University of Warwick, 11-13 April. (more…)

The ‘Part-time Occupational Penalty’: Lower Quality Jobs For British Women Who Don’t Want To Work Full-time

Monday, May 14th, 2007 by Paul Ayres

Royal Economic Society logoIn the latest of a series of interviews from the Royal Economic Society Conference 2007, Romesh Vaitilingam talks to Victoria Prowse about the ‘Part-time Occupational Penalty’ for UK women.

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No matter what qualifications they have or how big their family is, British women face a substantial occupational penalty if they work part-time. That is the central finding of new research by Victoria Prowse, presented to the Royal Economic Society’s 2007 annual conference at the University of Warwick. (more…)

Higher Divorce Risk Raises Women’s Working Hours

Thursday, May 10th, 2007 by Paul Ayres

Royal Economic Society logoIn the latest of a series of interviews from the Royal Economic Society Conference 2007, Romesh Vaitilingam talks to Kerry Papps the effect of divorce on women and work.

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Married women work more hours in the labour market when they face a high likelihood of divorce: for example, a woman who is unhappy with her marriage will work on average 283 hours more in the following year than a woman who is very happy with her marriage. In contrast, married men are unaffected by the probability of divorce.

These are among the findings of new research by Kerry Papps. The study also finds that both single men and single women work more when they have a high chance of marrying in the near future.

(more…)